eb™FFT FOOD-FART-TRUCE FOOD SUPPLEMENT
eb™FFT FOOD-FART-TRUCE FOOD SUPPLEMENT
eb™FFT FOOD-FART-TRUCE FOOD SUPPLEMENT
eb™FFT FOOD-FART-TRUCE FOOD SUPPLEMENT
eb™FFT FOOD-FART-TRUCE FOOD SUPPLEMENT
eb™FFT FOOD-FART-TRUCE FOOD SUPPLEMENT
eb™FFT FOOD-FART-TRUCE FOOD SUPPLEMENT

eb™FFT FOOD-FART-TRUCE FOOD SUPPLEMENT

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What is Globally unique eb™FFT / Food Fart Truce supplement used for?
• Weight-Loss/Weight Block , Gas problems, bloated belly,  tightened belly, Improvement of attention. Mental alertness.
• A non-pharmacological & ONLY-Physical adsorption based gastric Acidity nullifier.
• Tea contains polyphenols & other components that may reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases from free radicals & toxins.
• Activated charcoal contributes to the reduction of excessive intestinal gas accumulation.
• Reduction of bloating: a beneficial physiological effect.
• Reduction in abdominal pain with no side effects.
• Diarrhoea: It might be able to prevent bacteria and drugs that can cause diarrhoea from being absorbed into the body by trapping them on its porous, textured surface. Activated charcoal might have few side effects, especially in comparison with common antidiarrheal medications; but also could hinder the drug absorption.
• Teeth whitening & oral health


• The Official Statement on Activated Charcoal (EFSA): There is an authorised health claim for activated charcoal. To give the specific wording, EFSA agrees that activated charcoal supports the “reduction of excessive intestinal gas accumulation”.


• Detox & eliminate potential toxins from the digestive system.
• Cholesterol Control: Any supplement or medicine that has the potential to significantly yet safely reduce cholesterol in the body is of great interest to researchers. One such study tested the effects of activated charcoal on individuals with high cholesterol levels. Taking 8 grams of charcoal, three times a day, seems to have “locked” some of the potentially dangerous cholesterol away, quickly removing it from the body. As a result, harmful LDL cholesterol fell by between 25% and 41% over a period of just four weeks, while beneficial HDL cholesterol rose by an average of 8%. This is a powerful and potentially exciting discovery, but more research will be required to implement it medically.
• Prevent a hangover: Activated charcoal is also available in tablet or capsule forms to treat gas. This form is not used to treat a poisoning. Activated charcoal is a manufactured product. You cannot find it naturally in foods.



Recommended Daily Intake & Instructions:
• For Adults (over 18 years of age).
Product Code PT02
Product Name: FOOD FART TRUCE

Pack Size 60 Caps packed in a HDPE bottle labelled with all relevant information

Appearance
(shape/colour) Black coloured Capsule (clear shell) (vegicaps)
Size 60s Shape Oblong Capsule
Average Weight 700mg
Ingredients Activated Charcoal, Black Tea Extract (10:1), Magnesium Stearate
Suitability Vegan Yes Vegetarian Yes
Quality Requirements All the ingredients meet the requirements of USP/NF, BP, EP, BHP pharmacopoeia or supplier specifications
Expiration Period Three years from date of manufacture
Storage Store in a cool dry place, at or below 25°C / room temperature. Keep away from heat or direct sunlight. Keep out of sight and reach of children.

Caution Seek professional advice before taking this supplement if you are on prescribed medication, pregnant or breastfeeding.

Disclaimer Use product according to directions stated on the pack.
Food supplements should not be used as a substitute for a varied and balanced diet and healthy lifestyle.
Please check with your primary healthcare physician before taking this supplement if you suffer from a medical condition, are on prescribed medication, are pregnant or breastfeeding or suffer from food allergies.
Food supplements are not intended to treat or prevent any disease.
Do not use after the expiry date.

• Two capsules daily; half an hour prior or after any meal.
• Stay extra hydrated when on these (or any) capsules.
• For external use, can be applied to the skin as part of a daily skincare routine and to hair as an excellent hair detox.
Caution:
• Stop usage & See a doctor is case of any issue, allergy or difficulty in stomach/abdomen.
• If on ANY other medication(s), do not consume these capsules.
• Consume frequent water daily when on these capsules.
• Children & Adolescents; Consume under guidance of a legal guardian / parent AND after consulting medical professional(s).


MECHANISM OF ACTION


What is FOOD FART TRUCE capsules food supplement & its mechanism?
A unique formulation developed by EDI BERYL LTD, based on individual food profile & benefit of its ingredients; Black Tea & Activated Charcoal.
Black Tea Extract:
1. Black tea and improvement of attention:
a. Evaluation of a health claim pursuant to Article 13(5) of Regulation (EC) No 1924/2006. Conclusions: On the basis of the data presented, the Panel concludes that:
i. Black tea characterised by its content of tea solids, caffeine and L-theanine, which is the subject of the health claim, is sufficiently characterised in relation to the claimed effect.
ii. The claimed effect: ‘improvement of attention’. The target population proposed by the applicant is ‘adults in general population’. Improvement of attention is a beneficial physiological effect.
iii. A cause and effect relationship has been established between the consumption of black tea and improvement of attention.
iv. Following wording reflects scientific evidence: ‘Owing to its caffeine content, black tea improves attention’. In order to obtain the claimed effect, 2–3 servings of black tea providing at least 75 mg of caffeine in total should be consumed within 90 min.
v. The target population is adults in the general population.
2. webMD Uses & Effectiveness:
a. Mental alertness.
b. For Hardening of the arteries (atherosclerosis): Early research shows that people who drink black tea seem to have a reduced risk of having their arteries become hardened. This link is stronger in women than men.
c. Low blood pressure after eating (postprandial hypotension): Drinking black tea helps increase blood pressure in older people who have low blood pressure after eating.
d. Kidney stones: Women who drink black tea seem to have an 8% lower risk of developing kidney stones.
e. Heart attacks: Some research shows that people who drink black tea have a lower risk of having a heart attack.
f. Brittle bones (osteoporosis): Early research shows that older women who drink more black tea seem to have stronger bones. Drinking more black tea also seems to be linked with a lower risk of hip fracture in older men and women.
g. Ovarian cancer: Women, who regularly drink tea, including black tea or green tea, appear to have a lower risk of developing ovarian cancer compared to women who never or rarely drink tea.
h. Parkinson's disease: Some research shows that people who drink caffeinated beverages have a lower risk of Parkinson's disease. The lower risk seems to be directly related to the dose of caffeine in men but not women. Drinking black tea also appears to be linked with a reduced risk of Parkinson's disease among people who smoke cigarettes.
3. Tea and Health: Studies in Humans: Conclusion:
a. It is increasingly appreciated that tea contains polyphenols and other components that may reduce the risk of developing chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, arthritis and diabetes.
b. Tea acts as a chemo-preventive agent against a wide range of cancers. To evaluate the efficacy of tea against cancer, clinical trials are being conducted. Encouraging data from many trials are available and from many ongoing trials are awaited. However, results from human studies are not always positive, may be, due to the fact that the higher doses of tea are used in animal studies than those consumed by humans and in animal studies, the experimental conditions are generally optimized for the evaluation of a protective effect. Large scale well-controlled human clinical trials are necessary to establish the health promoting effects of tea consumption.
c. There was sufficient evidence to show risk reduction for CHD at intakes of > or = 3 cups per day and for improved antioxidant status at intakes of one to six cups per day. A maximum intake of eight cups per day would minimise any risk relating to excess caffeine consumption. Black tea generally had a positive effect on health.
Activated Charcoal:
1. Contributes to reducing excessive flatulence.
2. Traditionally: contribute to good digestive comfort.
3. Medical / Therapeutic Authorities have only approved activated charcoal for the emergency treatment of overdoses or poisonings.
4. Activated Charcoal reduces the gastric absorption by 60%.
5. EFSA Panel concludes:
a. The food constituent, activated charcoal, which is the subject of the health claim, is sufficiently characterised in relation to the claimed effect.
b. Reduction of excessive intestinal gas accumulation: In the context of the clarifications provided by Member States, it is assumed that the claimed effect refers to reducing excessive intestinal gas accumulation. Reduction of excessive intestinal gas accumulation is a beneficial physiological effect. A cause and effect relationship has been established between the consumption of activated charcoal and reduction of excessive intestinal gas accumulation.
c. The following wording reflects the scientific evidence: “Activated charcoal contributes to the reduction of excessive intestinal gas accumulation”. In order to obtain the claimed effect, the intake of activated charcoal should be 1 g at least 30 minutes before consumption of a meal and 1 g after the meal.
d. Reduction of bloating: The claimed effect is “gastrointestinal health”. The target population is assumed to be the general population. In the context of the clarifications provided by Member States, it is Activated charcoal related health claims EFSA Journal 2011;9(4):2049 9 assumed that the claimed effect refers to reducing bloating. Reduction of bloating is a beneficial physiological effect.
6. A significant reduction in abdominal pain with no side effects.
7. Diarrhoea: It might be able to prevent bacteria and drugs that can cause diarrhoea from being absorbed into the body by trapping them on its porous, textured surface. While noting it might be suitable in management for diarrhoea, with water & minerals management till the root cause / pathological cause is eliminated; the researchers also pointed out that activated charcoal might had few side effects, especially in comparison with common antidiarrheal medications; but also could hinder the drug absorption.
8. Teeth whitening & oral health: As oral health products; antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, detoxifying, teeth whitening or oral health (properly sized samples or tests not done).
9. Skin care: Activated charcoal can draw micro particles, such as dirt, dust, chemicals, toxins, and bacteria, to the surface of the skin, to make removing them easier. Skin infection: Traditional medicine practitioners (& THMP Product prescribers plus consultants) often use activated charcoal powder made from coconut shells to treat soft tissue conditions, such as skin infections.
10. Medical/Hospital uses of activated charcoal:
a. Often help clear toxins and drugs that include (but not limited to): NSAIDs & other OTC anti-inflammatories, sedatives, calcium channel blockers, dapsone, carbamazepine, malaria medications, methylxanthines (mild stimulants).
b. Activated charcoal cannot bind to all types of toxins or drugs, especially ones that are corrosive; Hence cannot help clear include: alcohols, lye, iron, lithium, petroleum products, such as fuel oil, gasoline, paint thinner, and some cleaning products
c. Risks: To date, there have been no adverse reactions noted with activated charcoal in any of its various forms.
d. People taking medications should talk with a doctor before taking oral activated charcoal products, however, as these may interfere with absorption of their medication.
11. The Official Statement on Activated Charcoal (EFSA):
a. “So far we have examined a range of scientific studies carried out on activated charcoal. The evidence, you might agree, is really quite impressive. However there is one more piece of evidence that is worth considering; the official government guidelines about activated charcoal. The health-related claims that can be made on a product’s packaging or sales material is governed by an organisation known as the European Food Safety Authority - or EFSA for short. It is important to state that EFSA takes their job very seriously indeed, and requires a considerable weight of evidence before they will “authorise” any claim surrounding dietary supplements and functional foods. Consequently, there are numerous cases where EFSA do not consider the weight of evidence to be strong enough to agree a claim. It is therefore fascinating to consider that there *is* an authorised health claim for activated charcoal. To give the specific wording, EFSA agrees that activated charcoal supports the “reduction of excessive intestinal gas accumulation”. The wealth of evidence required to authorise such a claim is exceptional, and so any reader wondering about whether to consider the use of activated charcoal for gas and bloating should feel comforted by EFSA’s findings and later statement. Even the medical professionals agree that it has potential benefits for sufferers.
b. Dosage: Experts disagree on the specific dosage of activated charcoal that should be used to see a beneficial effect. Part of the difficulty stems from the way in which our digestive systems are all quite different, being affected by anything from the specific foods we choose to eat, the balance of healthy gut bacteria, and any specific allergies we may have.
c. All the same, the EFSA has used the wealth of studies carried out to suggest that to have a beneficial effect on stomach gas you should aim to consume at least one gram of activated charcoal “at least 3 minutes before consumption of a meal” and a similar amount soon afterward. That said, many of our customers have reported benefits when simply consuming activated charcoal after eating in cases where gas arises.
d. Side Effects & Safety: Swallowing charcoal sounds like a rather odd thing to do - despite the wealth of evidence surrounding the potential health benefits. As an inert substance, whose beneficial effect is due to its physical structure rather than any chemical properties, activated charcoal is generally considered very safe in supplement form.
e. There have been cases of issues when charcoal dust is inhaled over an extended period of time, but buying either tablets or capsules this is unlikely to cause an issue. A bigger potential issue revolves around obstructions in the gut. However, in the few reported cases where this has happened, the individuals in question have consumed vast amounts of charcoal before issues arose. For example, one well publicised case involved the consumption of 240 grams of activated charcoal - equivalent to over four whole tubs of our activated charcoal capsules in a short space of time.
f. One factor that you should bear in mind is that activated charcoal doesn’t just absorb gas; it can also absorb other medications present in the gut. Consequently, if you’re taking prescription medications you may want to consider avoiding activated charcoal, or taking it some time away from the medicinal dose.
g. How Activated Charcoal Benefit Gas & Bloating Does: The science behind how activated charcoal works its magic is intriguing. The process of “activating” the charcoal involves exposing it to ultra-high temperatures. This action creates thousands of tiny microscopic pits on the surface of the charcoal. This gives it a “honeycomb-like” consistency, and it is these tiny gaps that provide the beneficial impact. When activated charcoal comes into contact with impurities like stomach gas or toxins (see below) these are absorbed into the tiny gaps found on the particle surfaces. They are essentially locking them away these impurities safely and allowing them to be passed swiftly in normal digestive processes.
h. What Else Does Activated Charcoal Do:
i. Detox: It has also been tested and used extensively to eliminate potential toxins from the digestive system. One of the most intriguing of these is the use of activated charcoal as a way to render drugs harmless. Studies have shown that consuming activated charcoal soon after aspirin results in a 50% drop in the volume of drug found in non-treated individuals. This is comparable with individuals who are artificially induced to vomit the aspirin back up after consumption. However it’s not just aspirin that activated charcoal can help to detoxify. A range of other drugs can also be affected by charcoal, so an increasing number of medical practitioners are using it in cases of deliberate or accidental drug overdoses.
ii. Cholesterol Control: High cholesterol levels are associated with heart disease and a range of associated conditions. Unfortunately, many individuals with high cholesterol are unaware of their condition until emergency action needs to be taken. Consequently, any supplement or medicine that has the potential to significantly yet safely reduce cholesterol in the body is of great interest to researchers. One such study tested the effects of activated charcoal on individuals with high cholesterol levels. Taking 8 grams of charcoal, three times a day, seems to have “locked” some of the potentially dangerous cholesterol away, quickly removing it from the body. As a result, harmful LDL cholesterol fell by between 25% and 41% over a period of just four weeks, while beneficial HDL cholesterol rose by an average of 8%. This is a powerful and potentially exciting discovery, but more research will be required if it is to become a recommended treatment for high cholesterol.
iii. Conclusion: As we have seen, not only is there good evidence that activated charcoal can help with gas and bloating, but that it also has an enviable safety profile. Taking these two factors into consideration, if you’re someone who suffers from discomfort as a result of a distended stomach or excessive gas build-up after eating, activated charcoal may represent a cost-effective and drug-free option.
iv. Activated charcoal is sometimes used to help treat a drug overdose or a poisoning. When you take activated charcoal, drugs and toxins can bind to it. This helps rid the body of unwanted substances. Charcoal is made from coal, wood, or other substances. It becomes "activated charcoal" when high temperatures combine with a gas or activating agent to expand its surface area. People take activated charcoal to manage a poisoning or overdose. When used along with other treatments, activated charcoal may be effective for an acute poisoning. But it is NOT useful in some cases, including poisoning from: Cyanide, Lithium, Alcohol, Iron tablets. It also is not used to treat poisons such as strong acids or bases. With a poisoning, don't guess about the right thing to do. Call your local poison control centre immediately. And get to an emergency room. You need to use activated charcoal as soon as possible if it is recommended. Other less studied uses of activated charcoal include: Treat a condition of pregnancy in which the normal flow of bile is affected (cholestasis), Prevent gas, Reduce high cholesterol, Prevent a hangover. Early research about using activated charcoal to treat cholestasis of pregnancy is very limited. More studies are needed to prove its safety and effectiveness. It's not clear whether activated charcoal helps improve gas and cholesterol. That's because the research results so far have been inconsistent. As for hangover remedies with activated charcoal, there isn't really any evidence that it works. The activated charcoal that is used to treat a poisoning is a powder that is mixed with a liquid. Once mixed, it can be given as a drink or through a tube that has been placed through the mouth and into the stomach. Activated charcoal is also available in tablet or capsule forms to treat gas. This form is not used to treat a poisoning. Activated charcoal is a manufactured product. You cannot find it naturally in foods. When used to treat a poisoning or overdose, activated charcoal is usually safe, but it needs to be administered only in a health care facility. Side effects are more likely when it is used on a long-term basis to treat conditions like excess gas.
v. Side effects. When you take it by mouth, activated charcoal can cause: Black stools, Black tongue, Vomiting or diarrhoea, Constipation. In more serious cases, it can cause gastrointestinal blockages.
vi. Risks: Do not combine activated charcoal with drugs used for constipation (cathartics such as sorbitol or magnesium citrate). This can cause electrolyte imbalances and other problems.
vii. Interactions. Activated charcoal may reduce or prevent the absorption of certain drugs. This may include drugs such as: Acetaminophen, Digoxin, Theophylline, Tricyclic antidepressants. Do not use activated charcoal as a supplement if you take these medications. Activated charcoal may also reduce absorption of certain nutrients.
viii. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) do regulate dietary supplements; however, it treats them like foods rather than medications. Unlike drug manufacturers, the makers of supplements don’t have to show their products are safe or effective before selling them on the market. Be sure to tell your doctor about any supplement you're taking, even if it's natural. That way, your doctor can check on any potential side effects or interactions with medications, foods, or other herbs and supplements. He or she can let you know if the supplement might increase your risks.